The main symptoms of Covid disease varied between countries in 2020; See these from Brazil – Galileo Magazine

The main symptoms of Covid disease varied between countries in 2020;  See these from Brazil - Galileo Magazine

The main symptoms of Covid disease varied between countries in 2020; See these from Brazil (Photo: Towfiqu barbhuiya/Unsplash)

A global study by researchers at Imperial College London, England, showed that the most common symptoms of Covid-19 varied between each country in 2020. In Brazil, chest and joint pain were five times more common than the other 189 countries evaluated. . The results were published in the March issue of the journal electronic medicinewhich is part of Lancet Discovery Science.

Scientists used Healthily’s online symptom chart to collect self-reported data from 78,200 people between April and September 2020. Of these, nearly 7,900 tested positive for coronavirus in this period, 5,600 tested negative, and more than 64,600 were symptomatic but not tested. .

The bar graph shows respondents from the top 30 countries with the largest number of participants.  (Photo: Aldo Faisal et al.)

The bar graph shows respondents from the top 30 countries with the largest number of participants. (Photo: Aldo Faisal et al.)

Since the data represents symptoms at the start of the epidemic, it is a result only of the initial strains of Sars-CoV-2 circulating between April and September 2020, so it does not include variants such as delta or microns. Most of the responses came from India (22.5%), Mexico (16.8%), Pakistan (9.5%), the Philippines (9%), the United Kingdom (5.7%) and Brazil (5.5%).

Brazil vs other countries

In relation to volunteers from other countries, Brazilians had higher rates of the following symptoms: itchy eyes (19%); loss of smell and taste (50.8%); Loss of appetite (24.2%). joint pain (19.1%); Headache (50.6%) and chest pain (16.8%).

Our country ranked second with the highest percentage of participants testing positive (17.1%), after Mexico (27.6%). In addition, it was Brazilians and Mexicans with confirmed infections who complained more about itchy eyes and headaches, compared to people of other nationalities.

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The graph shows the association between location, underlying health status and Covid-19 symptoms.  Light colors mean that symptoms are more likely to be reported for the corresponding country or underlying condition;  The black color shows that the difference is not significant (Photo: Aldo Faisal et al.)

The graph shows the association between location, underlying health status and Covid-19 symptoms. Light colors mean that symptoms are more likely to be reported for the corresponding country or underlying condition; The black color shows that the difference is not significant (Photo: Aldo Faisal et al.)

Pakistani participants were four times more likely to report chest pain and five times more likely to have joint pain. Those from India were three times more likely to have chest pain and four times more likely to have joint pain.

On the other hand, symptoms in the UK differed significantly from those in other countries, with most respondents being older than other nationalities. Britons were five times more likely to report phlegm and shortness of breath, as well as three times more likely to report chills, fatigue and headaches.

In general, participants with underlying conditions were more likely to have multiple symptoms compared to individuals without these conditions. Those who tested positive for Covid-19 and had asthma suffer from fatigue, headaches and shortness of breath. Those with lung disease were more likely to have chest pain and phlegm, but had a lower risk of losing their sense of smell and taste. Volunteers with type 2 diabetes reported more episodes of fever.

The researchers believe the study could help structure new research with global data, allowing similarities between health conditions, region and symptom profile to be identified. Aldo Faisal, senior author of the survey, says in communication.

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About the Author: Camelia Kirk

"Friendly zombie guru. Avid pop culture scholar. Freelance travel geek. Wannabe troublemaker. Coffee specialist."

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