See how Brazilian cities can be affected by sea level as temperatures rise, according to research | environment

Measuring and presenting the impact of rising global temperature and sea level rise was the subject of a survey conducted by Climate Central, a US-based non-profit organization, in partnership with Princeton University and the Potsdam Institute for the Study of Climate Impact in Germany. .

Work published in the journal Environmental Research Letters identified regions of the world that could be subject to “unprecedented” flooding if policies to combat climate change are not now put in place by countries.

Below, see examples of Climate Central’s forecasts for some Brazilian cities:

Salvador, Elevador Lacerda region

Seeing Salvador in the current panorama – Photo: Climate Central / Publishing

Simulation of Salvador looking at a 1.5°C temperature increase – Photo: Climate Central / Publishing

Simulation of Salvador considering a 3°C temperature increase – Photo: Climate Central / Publishing

Recife, view from the Casa Amarilla district

Recife, view from the Casa Amarilla district, current situation – Photo: Climate Central / Divulgação

Recife, seen from the Casa Amarilla region, projecting as temperature increases by 1.5°C – Photo: Climate Central/Publishing

Recife, seen from the Casa Amarilla area, projecting as the temperature rises by 3°C – Photo: Climate Central/Publishing

Fortaleza, Mucuribe Lighthouse District

Fortaleza, Mucuripe Lighthouse region: Current Status – Photo: Climate Central / Disclosure

Fortaleza, Mucuripe Lighthouse region: Drop by 1.5°C n – Photo: Climate Central / Disclosure

Fortaleza, Mucuripe Lighthouse region: Drop by 3°C – Photo: Climate Central / Disclosure

Porto Alegre, Usina do Gasômetro

Porto Alegre, Usina do Gasômetro: current situation – Photo: Climate Central / Disclosure

Porto Alegre, Usina do Gasômetro area: projection as temperature rises by 1.5°C – Photo: Climate Central/Publishing

Porto Alegre, Usina do Gasômetro area: temperature projection at 3°C ​​- Photo: Climate Central/Publishing

Rio de Janeiro, Botafogo station area

Rio de Janeiro, Botafogo station area: current panorama and 1.5°C increase – Photo: Climate Central / Disclosure

Rio de Janeiro, Botafogo station area: 3°C global temperature increase expected – Photo: Climate Central/Disclosure

According to researchers, the worst increase in temperature (up to 4 degrees Celsius) can cause the sea to invade the territories occupied by up to 15% of the current world population, which is equivalent to about one billion people.

On the other hand, achieving the more ambitious targets of the Paris Climate Agreement is likely to halve exposure, the scientists say.

Floods, snow and extreme heat: How climate change is affecting the planet

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