First rocket launch in the UK ends in failure

First rocket launch in the UK ends in failure

The historic mission to the UK was terminated after a malfunction with the LauncherOne rocket, resulting in the loss of 9 satellites. watching video

Emerson Brandau

11 months ago

First rocket launch in the UK ends in failure

Image: Virgin Orbit/Disclosure

The first launch of a space mission from the United Kingdom ended in failure. After experiencing an in-flight malfunction, Virgin Orbit’s LauncherOne rocket was unable to reach the scheduled orbit, prematurely ending the mission.

Unlike other space launches, the Virgin Orbit rocket is launched from the wing of a modified 747-400 — called Cosmic Girl. This allows missiles to be launched from various regions of the world, without the need for a traditional launch tower.


The aircraft took off from the runway of the newly built Cornwall Spaceport, last Monday night (9), and launched LauncherOne into the air at 8:11 pm (Brasilia time), while flying over the southwest coast of Ireland. The rocket then turned on its first stage engines and operated for about five minutes as planned.

However, a technical malfunction occurred during the launch of the missile’s second stage engine, while it was traveling at a speed of more than 17,000 kilometers per hour. Despite reaching space, the rocket did not reach the correct orbit, losing its payload of nine small satellites from seven different customers – including the first satellite manufactured in Wales.

On Twitter, Virgin Orbit ended up getting in trouble by tweeting that the mission had been completed successfully, then deleting the post to report the anomaly that had been discovered. You can watch the live broadcast in the video below:

See also  The study says that myopia may result from genetics and higher education


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Co18HcyqHk

Of the five missions already launched using the Launcher One rocket, this is the first time it has taken place on British soil, and it is also the first to fail to complete its mission.

in NBDan Hart, the company’s CEO, said he was proud of the many things Virgin Orbit has achieved so far. “We will work tirelessly to understand the nature of the failure, take corrective action and return to orbit once the full investigation is completed,” the CEO said.


Hard has also stated that he intends to release a second release in the UK later this year, as well as in other locations around the world. It is worth noting that Virgin Orbit has already received permission from the AEB (Brazilian Space Agency) and FAB (Brazilian Air Force) to launch its rockets from the Alcântara Launch Center in Maranhão.

You May Also Like

About the Author: Camelia Kirk

"Friendly zombie guru. Avid pop culture scholar. Freelance travel geek. Wannabe troublemaker. Coffee specialist."

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *